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    Things to Consider Before Featuring Other Artists or Accepting a Feature

    • 3 min read

    Things to Consider Before Featuring Other Artists or Accepting a Feature

    As an independent artist, you should beware of the invitations you accept and those you invite for features. There are important factors you should consider before you accept an invite or send out one for features. Let’s run through some of them below.

    1. The first thing you should consider is the Audience.

    Most artists have good knowledge of their audience because they interact with them online. Know what your audience expects of you, will they be able to connect with you? Can you satisfy their social needs by the feature?

    The crowd will need to be familiar with your type of music before you are well accepted to perform for them. You can do this by interacting with the fans of those who are inviting you. If you invite artists, create an online meet, and greet with your fans, make some videos with the two of you together and notice the reception that your invited artist will have.

    Know your fans and what they will need to be excited. Also consider whether you have performed for this set of audience before.

    2. Goals

    You have to know what your goals are and the strategy you are using. Know when to release your music and what to expect after you release the music. You should know what to expect on the week you release the music, three months after the release, and then 12 months after the release date. Together you can go through the goals and ensure it doesn't drop below your expectations. As a matter of fact, features are a powerful growth strategy for musicians, so if you are featuring someone or you are accepting a feature, you have to be clear on your goals, know the goal you want to score and play strategically to win..

    3. Cost

    No doubt, featuring an artist or accepting a feature will come with some benefits and financial costs as well. You should ensure you consider if it is worth it before you accept an invite. In the long run, assessing the cost can also give you a picture of how feasible it is.

    4. Documentation

    As much as you can, ensure that every contract that is entered into by the two of you is well documented. Your role during the project should be clearly stated and the time expected of you to deliver your part of the deal.

    Marketing can mean different things to your other artist. For you, marketing can mean content creation, radio and press, community management, and social media. But your colleague may see marketing as just running social media ads. So you need to state details very clearly and the involvement of everyone during the content creating and marketing stages.

    Stating facts like things you expect to change after completing the project allows the other artist to mention areas that he is most concerned with and proficient at. If you have different expectations, then you can quickly bring it up and get clarity on it.

    5. Future Projections

    It would help if you also talked about the partnership that you are expecting; talk about the brands that your invitee can bring to the table. You can take a stroll to the artist's home, know what brand he is genuinely into, and see how you can get that on the table.

    6. Assess Common Interests

    The social issues you are most interested in should also be analyzed and talked about. No matter how meager it is, you will have to understand how it can directly impact community engagement on the project.

    There are pros and cons to featuring in someone else's project. One of the cons involve reneging on the said agreement; this is the more reason all details of the project need to be placed on a legal document. Do not get emotional about the project that the crucial aspect of documentation is omitted. Also, ensure professional help with this documentation.

    Take time to speak with a mutual friend about the deal before going on with it; ensure you settle all the concerns raised by a third party so that you can get a smooth ride for the project. Use the period for preparing for the project to get things straight before you get fully involved. It is better to pull out early than regret your involvement in the end.

    Understand the vision of the artist that is inviting you and know how to align it with yours. If the vision is very different, then there is no need for you to be featured in the first place.